By Kaitlyn McLintock

There are people who use oils and moisturizers interchangeably. If parched skin presents itself, they reach for whichever product is closest to them, either distributing a few drops of a silky oil around the skin or dispensing a dollop of creamy moisturizer. Any moisturizing product is better than none, so by that logic, oils, and moisturizers are kind of the same thing, right? The answer is not quite. Let us explain.

While it’s true that both oils and moisturizers alleviate the look and feel of dehydrated skin, they do so differently, and in order to use these products most effectively, you need to know how and why they work the way that they do. Before we get ahead of ourselves, however, we need to add 2 new words to our skincare vocabulary—humectant and occlusive.

Let’s start with the word humectant first. A humectant is anything that pulls water into the skin, either from the air or a topical product (popular humectants include glycerin, hyaluronic acid, and aloe vera). These ingredients literally increase the amount of water that’s present in our skin cells, thus hydrating our skin. An occlusive, on the other hand, is something that forms a barrier on the skin, preventing the water that’s already in our skin from leaving it.

So, how does that apply to the oil vs. moisturizer debate? Well, to put it simply, oils are occlusives, and moisturizers are humectants. In other words, oils trap water in the skin, preventing trans-epidermal water loss (which is otherwise known as TEWL), but they don’t pull any added water in. Moisturizers, on the other hand, are often formulated with humectants such as glycerin or aloe vera as the primary ingredient, meaning they have the ability to draw new water into our skin cells.

Keep in mind that this isn’t necessarily a hard and fast rule, because there are many products on the market that include both humectants and occlusives as ingredients. Take Goldfaden’s Vital Boost Moisturizer, for instance. This antioxidant-rich moisturizer is formulated with a combination of glycerin and hyaluronic acid (humectants), and jojoba and grapefruit oil (occlusives). This fusion of ingredients hydrates the skin instantly and keeps that hydration there long-term.

Because oils and moisturizers work differently, one isn’t necessarily better, or more effective, than the other. In fact, many people use moisturizers and oils in tandem (this is our favorite tip, especially for those of us who live in cold climates or are prone to dry skin). After cleansing, toning, and treating the skin, apply a moisturizer. After the moisturizer is applied, follow up with an oil. Why the back-to-back application, you ask? It’s simple. The oil will seal in the moisturizer, keeping the skin hydrated for longer and warding off the dreaded tenants of dry skin such as redness, flakiness, and itchiness. (We like using the Fleuressence Native Botanical Cell Oil, which is formulated with a mix of omega fatty acid-rich oils—including baobab, Kalahari, rosehip, and jojoba oils).

ABOUT THE WRITER:

Kaitlyn McLintock is a beauty and wellness writer based in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in such publications as Popsugar, Byrdie, Hello Giggles, Who What Wear, and more. When she’s not writing, researching, and editing, or testing out the latest skincare and makeup products, she’s drinking coffee and spritzing Goldfaden’s Mist RX all over her skin.

As fall approaches, our beauty regimen and routine might involve some changes. Whether you have spent your summer days under the beaming sun tanning or packing your skin with Vitamin-C infused serums, your glowing complexion can transition into the fall season. Sometimes adopting a minimalist approach toward skincare can reap more benefits than adding a load of beauty products. But also, you need to change your lifestyle to reclaim your skin’s natural health. Many beauty specialists swear by the “less is more” motto and embracing a sustainable skincare regimen leads to lasting results.

Colder temperatures call for a switch in our beauty habits. From the things we consume to the time we go to sleep, our daily habits influence our health. A natural beauty routine is the right solution for treating long-term skin issues. Here are the best tips to refresh your skincare in 2020.

Win at sleep

Put a halt to sleep deprivation and set up a bed schedule. Your body has a natural sleep cycle and a regular sleep schedule can help your skin restore its natural beauty. To get you in a sleeping mode, ban electronics two hours before bed and avoid fatty foods before hitting the sack. Instead, eat almonds which help boost sleep quality and use a silk mask to help you fall asleep faster.

Moisturize and protect your skin from sun damage

We recommend using a heavier cream like ​Goldfaden’s Wake Up Call​ for a night treatment while resting. This cream targets dry and aging skin while smoothing fine lines. Dermatologist and skin expert, Dr. Alicia Barba says “If you suffer from dry skin, avoid hot showers and choose a lurk warm temperature which prevents stripping away our skin’s natural moisture.” Also, always use sunscreen even if it’s cloudy outside. UV rays can still harm your skin during colder months.

Freshen up your skincare routine

Tailor your skincare regimen according to your lifestyle. When it comes to skin detoxing, more is not always better. A mistake most people make is over-exfoliating their skin. Too much exfoliation can strip the skin from its natural oil. ​Goldfaden’s Fresh A Peel​ contains lactic acid and multi-fruit enzymes to balance your skin tone and reduce the appearance of lines and pores. A monthly hydration treatment can also help boost your skin glow. In addition, choose a water-based cleanser like gel or foam, which help remove dead skin cells.

Apply hyaluronic acid

A hyaluronic acid serum helps restore the skin’s moisture barrier while providing more glow. Is important to always layer your serum with a water-based moisturizer to protect the skin’s microbiome.

Use probiotic-based formulas

Probiotics are the answer to target skin issues such as eczema, breakouts and psoriasis. These microorganisms serve as a shield to environmental factors while protecting your skin from bad bacteria.

Try a supergreen diet

A healthier diet is key to battling acne, reduce inflammation and boost your immunity for healthy skin. Reclaim your skin health with power foods such as tomatoes, pumpkin and broccoli. After all, you are what you eat and your meal’s composition can be the solution for cleaner skin. Research conducted by the ​American Journal of Clinical Dermatology​ has proven how diet plays a role in our lives and concluded a correlation between acne and dairy. Choose milk alternatives such as oat milk or soy, and replace cheese for a free-lactose option.

Invest in a blue light device

The FDA has proven blue light therapy to be effective for acne treatment. Blue light devices help target acne-causing bacteria by drying the oil that causes the germs. This is a non-invasive treatment you can try at home while saving money on the dermatologist.

Movement is key

Aside from exercising daily, it is important we move our facial muscles too. Imagine working out your face muscles every day? It boosts your collagen production and your muscles will get more toned. To improve your skin’s sculpture, massage your face with circular motions or use a lymphatic massage roller to boost skin cells.

 

ABOUT THE WRITER:

Jannely Espinal is a curious writer and editor demystifying beauty myths. She has a penchant for fashion history and cultural beauty practices. Recently, she conducted interviews with skincare specialists and celebrities for HOLA! USA, as well as spearheading the lifestyle vertical. Throughout her career, she has attended Milan and New York Fashion Week while unveiling several celebrities’ beauty tips, including Romee Strijd and Patrick Ta. Her mission is to change the narrative on skincare issues and help her readers understand health, wellness and beauty as a whole.

After 50 years of practicing Dermatology and treating diseases of the skin, Dr. Goldfaden has seen the full spectrum of skin conditions. “The skin on your body is as important as the skin on your face.” Choosing clean body products can target and correct the most common body issue most people are dealing with. Dr. G created our NEW Body Collection to extend healthy skin care from the chest down. Our Doctor’s Body Scrub is a multi-active scrub features micro-fine exfoliating crystals, skin-softening Bamboo Extract, skin-brightening Fruit Enzymes, soothing Probiotic-fermented Extract, and antioxidant-rich Red Algae. After exfoliating, Firm Believer Body Serum offers elasticity enhancing Radish Root Extract and skin softening Marula Oil and Shea Butter. Hyaluronic Acid helps to hydrate and plump skin while a combination of Brown + Red Algae along with Coffee & Gotu Kola Extracts work to increase microcirculation while helping to firm and tone the skin.

We asked Dr. G to weigh in on common body skin conditions (and some you may not have heard of) and how exfoliation is still the most important and effective part of your skincare regimen. Of course if you think you may be suffering from any of the below, you should see your dermatologist for a formal diagnosis, but in the meantime taking time to care and treat your body at home will not only make your skin glow but also make you feel good.

Keratosis Pilaris

What is it: A very common especially in females and children.  Keratosis Pilaris is caused by a buildup of keratin, excess skin and oil which blocks the hair follicle causing little bumps (often white) under the skin’s surface. Found on the arms and thighs. Very commonly this is an inherited condition and people may refer to it as ‘chicken skin’.

How to help: Exfoliation won’t cure Keratosis Pilaris but it can help the roughness of the skin and the appearance of the bumps. Physical exfoliants (like a scrub) can assist in smoother, more even-textured skin, while a chemical exfoliant such as Lactic, Glycolic or fruit acids can work in tandem to smooth skin out.  Hydrating the skin is also very important when treating Keratosis Pilaris.

Xerosis

What is it:  The medical term for ‘excess dry skin’, Xerosis is caused by lack of moisture in the skin. This can be caused by dry climates, cold weather, artificial heating and aging.

How to help: Regular exfoliation of the body will remove dead, dry skin allowing active hydrating ingredients to treat the skin. Systemic hydration (drinking water, eating foods high with a high-water content and topical hydration (serums, moisturizers, lotions and creams) are crucial to reverse and treat Xerosis.

Ichthyosis

What is it:  An inherited condition, which can vary in severity. Most commonly found on the legs, however, can be all over the body in more severe cases. Ichthyosis coming from the Greek word for ‘fish’ appears as dry, thickened, scaly skin.

How to help: Exfoliation will help this condition by removing dry, scaly skin. Use of a very hydrating body lotion or cream is preferred.

Teania Versicolor

What is it: Meaning ‘fungus of many colors’, Tinea Versicolor appears as white patchy, flat splotches usually found on the upper arms and face. More noticeable when the skin gets sun or tanned.

How to help: Exfoliation is excellent for the removal of the superficial fungus and dead skin.

Backne, Chest Breakouts and Butt Bumps

What are they:  Little or big bumps/pimples that show up on the back, the chest and the butt. All are considered acne and can be caused by hormones, clothing friction, cosmetic products/SPF that are too heavy or bacteria left behind from sweat and dirt. The overproduction of oil causes hair follicles to get clogged causing inflammation which is the pimple or bump that surfaces. You’re more prone to getting pimples and breakouts on your back vs. the face in general because those areas have high concentrations of hair follicles and sebaceous glands (glands that secrete an oily matter called sebum) which when clogged, cause breakouts. The skin located on the back is also very think and endures a different environment altogether. The back area is typically clothed, so the skin can’t breathe as easily and experiences conditions such as; sweat build-up, wearing tight and restrictive clothing when exercising and not showering after. This can lead to clogged hair follicles, over oil production, and acne.

How to help: Always shower after working out or sweating. Try and not sit around in damp workout clothing. Regular exfoliation unplugs clogged pores and allows for the release of natural skin oils. Regular exfoliation also helps to maintain open pores, decreases pore size, minimizes many types of superficial scarring and ward off bacteria which causes breakouts and rashes. Try switching to a lightweight body serum or oil-free lotion for the warmer months.